Arts and Culture

Adulkt Life’s Book of Curses: Indie veterans make a new beginning

By Erik Schreiber, 3 December 2020

On their debut album, Adulkt Life pay tribute to their musical influences and confront a world in acute crisis.

Music and aerosols: What the research reveals about the performing arts during a pandemic

By Benjamin Mateus, 2 December 2020

The Skagit Valley Chorale rehearsal on March 10 was one of the nation’s first super-spreading events. A University of Colorado study provided a critical recognition that the virus that caused COVID-19 spread predominately in the aerosol form.

The Queen’s Gambit: The coming of age of a chess prodigy

By Matthew Brennan and Fred Mazelis, 1 December 2020

This Netflix offering treats its subject with uncommon seriousness and humanity.

Utopia and the cartoonishness of “conspiracy theories”

By Carlos Delgado, 30 November 2020

The world is not shaped by the hidden machinations of elites, but by social development, the development of the class struggle.

Company Town: a damning look at the role of Unifor in the GM Oshawa plant closure

By Lee Parsons, 28 November 2020

The film follows events from the time of the closure announcement in November, 2018 until the final day of production a year later.

“Any return to ‘normality’ is a long way off”: Musicians and technicians speak to the WSWS

By John Newham, 27 November 2020

Several British artists and performance technicians spoke to the World Socialist Web Site about the impact of the pandemic on them and their work.

British government’s pandemic response threatens art and culture

By Paul Bond, 27 November 2020

The initial wage furlough scheme made no provision for self-employed and freelance workers, who make up the bulk of arts workers. When the government did eventually introduce its Self-Employed Income Support Scheme, many artists did not benefit.

Famed Turkish pianist, composer Timur Selçuk dies at 74

By Nazım Özgün, 26 November 2020

Selçuk was a prominent example of the layer of Turkish intellectuals who turned to the working class amid the political radicalization and social struggles of the 1970s.

Jeff Riedel, photographer and fighter for socialism: 1968-2020

By Fred Mazelis and Kevin Reed, 24 November 2020

An immensely gifted artist, Jeff Riedel’s photographic work combined exceptional technical skill with social insight.

Refugees season at the Imperial War Museum in London: A century of crises, but the real causes ignored

By Paul Mitchell, 24 November 2020

As to the causes of the continuous refugee crises over the last century, the exhibition answers with the obvious “conflict”, “modern war”, “threats of violence” and “social breakdown” but this begs the question, what causes these phenomena?

Trial 4: A shameless police frame-up in Boston

By Joanne Laurier, 24 November 2020

Trial 4 is an eight-episode documentary television series, currently streaming on Netflix that examines the case of Sean Ellis, a black teenager wrongly convicted of the 1993 murder of police officer John Mulligan.

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s This Side of Paradise at 100

By James McDonald, 23 November 2020

The 1920 novel rewards the contemporary reader with its psychological complexity, with Fitzgerald’s characteristically glittering lyrical sentences and with his equally characteristic trenchant insight into American class society.

Sri Lankan artists discuss COVID-19 and its impact on their creative work, living conditions

By Wasantha Rupasinghe, 21 November 2020

Musical performances, theatre, film and teledrama production, book exhibitions and similar activities have almost entirely come to a halt. Kapila Kumara Kalinga and Malaka Devapriya spoke to the WSWS about the situation.

The Endless Trench: Hiding for decades from the Spanish fascists

By David Walsh, 20 November 2020

The film fictionally treats an actual phenomenon, the dozens or more of left-wing opponents of Franco, known as “moles,” who concealed themselves in their own homes for 30 years following the defeat of the Republican forces in 1939.

Jacob Lawrence: The American Struggle—A remarkable exhibition

By Clare Hurley, 19 November 2020

A timely and long overdue exhibition of Struggle: From the History of the American People reunites this remarkable series of paintings by Jacob Lawrence, the famed African-American artist, for the first time since they were completed in 1956.

Italian actress Sophia Loren returns to the screen in The Life Ahead

By Fred Mazelis, 18 November 2020

The 86-year-old actress remains a magnetic presence in this worthwhile film.

German artists, cultural institutions fight for survival in COVID-19 crisis

By Stefan Steinberg, 17 November 2020

German artists and cultural institutions fear bankruptcy and destitution as the coronavirus crisis deepens and the government refuses to allocate adequate funding.

A conversation with musician, producer Fabrizio Grossi about the pandemic and its impact: “Short of a global revolution, I don’t see a solution”

By Marc Wells and David Walsh, 16 November 2020

Fabrizio Grossi is a veteran bassist, producer and music consultant, sometimes referred to in the media as “legendary.”

Re-release of Bong Joon-ho’s Memories of Murder (2003): A picture of South Korean society

By David Walsh, 14 November 2020

An early film by South Korean writer-director Bong Joon-ho (Parasite) has been released over the course of the past year in a number of countries—and now in the US. It is well worth seeing.

Belly of the Beast: The cruelty of forced sterilization in America

By Joanne Laurier, 13 November 2020

Belly of the Beast is a documentary on practices carried out at female penitentiaries in California.

Orchestra, opera musicians face severe pay cuts, furloughs, uncertainty in the midst of the pandemic

By David Walsh, 12 November 2020

Management at various orchestras, operas and other cultural organizations are taking full advantage of the COVID-19 crisis to press forward with their demands as part of an offensive for pay and other cuts under way for more than a decade.

Cobra Kai: The reboot of The Karate Kid film series

By Nick Barrickman, 11 November 2020

The series’ initial airing in May 2018 on YouTube’s platforms became the widest-viewed digital programming on the internet for that month. Since appearing on Netflix, the series has become the platform’s most popular program.

Which direction next? New albums from Khruangbin—Mordechai—and Sault—Untitled (Black Is)

By Matthew Brennan, 10 November 2020

Two interesting music groups in the recent period have been the rock and funk trio Khruangbin out of Houston Texas, and the British soul and funk collective known as Sault.

Rebecca (2020) and Rebecca (1940): A new film version of the popular novel, and the old one

By David Walsh, 9 November 2020

The Netflix film is an adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s 1938 novel of the same title, which was previously made into a film in 1940, directed by Alfred Hitchcock.

More than just James Bond: Sean Connery (1930-2020)

By Paul Bond, 7 November 2020

Strikingly attractive and hard-edged, Connery’s suave and imposing presence gave the character much of its authority.

Three short films–including The Present, about the brutality of Israeli checkpoints

By Joanne Laurier, 5 November 2020

Oppression of the Palestinians, child hunger and the COVID-19 pandemic are dealt with in two short films and an hour-long documentary.

Collected Ghazals: Poet Jim Harrison regains spontaneity through a fixed verse form

By Erik Schreiber, 4 November 2020

Harrison’s eclectic approach to the ghazal produced collage-like poems that combine personal and social concerns.

A conversation with Rick Poynor, author of David King: Designer, Activist, Visual Historian

By David Walsh, 3 November 2020

In mid-October, we reviewed a significant new work, David King: Designer, Activist, Visual Historian, by Rick Poynor, a writer in the UK on graphic design and visual communication. The WSWS recently spoke to Poynor.

Pianist Igor Levit joins rally against far-right Alternative for Germany in Potsdam

By Ulrich Rippert, 2 November 2020

Only days after several German newspapers published vicious denunciations of Igor Levit, the world renowned pianist participated in a rally against the far-right Alternative for Germany (AfD) in Potsdam.

The Hummingbird Project: Speed is of the essence

By David Walsh, 31 October 2020

Two cousins intend to shave milliseconds off the time it takes to make stock market trades and thus earn themselves a fortune.

Priceless artefacts vandalised in Berlin museums

By Stefan Steinberg, 29 October 2020

While the police investigate “in all directions,” there is considerable evidence to indicate the involvement of far-right forces in the attacks.

The World Socialist Web Site strives to raise the cultural level of the working class

By David Walsh, 28 October 2020

The remarks below were given by David Walsh, arts editor of the World Socialist Web Site.

The Nightingale: Australia’s brutal colonial past exposed

By Jason Quill, 27 October 2020

Jennifer Kent’s film follows Irish convict Clare Carroll through the Tasmanian wilderness in 1825, as she seeks revenge for a terrible act of violence committed against her family.

An audio adaptation of Sinclair Lewis’s It Can’t Happen Here: Fascism comes to America

By Carlos Delgado, 27 October 2020

The production, a “radio play” adaptation of Sinclair Lewis’s 1935 novel, depicts the US’s descent into dictatorship after the election of a demagogue.

Whose Vote Counts, Explained: Netflix series examines voting rights in America

By Fred Mazelis, 26 October 2020

Like all basic democratic rights, the right to vote can only be defended through the independent political struggle of the working class.

Right-wing press in Germany steps up attacks on pianist Igor Levit

By Ulrich Rippert, 26 October 2020

The Süddeutsche Zeitung editorial board’s initial defence of its article, as well as subsequent articles in Die Welt, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung and Neue Zürcher Zeitung, reveal that these leading newspapers share essentially the same line as the far right Alternative for Germany.

Aaron Sorkin’s The Trial of the Chicago 7: An important historical episode

By Joanne Laurier and David Walsh, 24 October 2020

The film deals with the court proceedings in 1969–70 in which organizers of protests at the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago faced charges of conspiracy and crossing state lines with the intent to incite a riot.

The pianist Igor Levit and the defense of culture against fascism

By David North and Clara Weiss, 22 October 2020

Levit has emerged as a powerful voice against the resurgence of neo-Nazism in Germany, which finds its most putrid expression in the growing political power of the Alternative für Deutschland.

On the brink: A photographic examination of social cleansing in London

By Paul Mitchell, 22 October 2020

“My aim is to focus on existing council properties that have been neglected due to the lack of maintenance. It’s imperative to showcase the decay of these buildings as it’s been a deliberate strategy to run them down.”—photographic artist Sarah Douglas

Further signs of the “devastating impact” of the pandemic on arts and artists: What are the implications?

By David Walsh, 21 October 2020

The ongoing destruction of the jobs, incomes and aspirations of tens of thousands of artists of every kind in the US and elsewhere has a significance that goes beyond the immediate cultural sphere.

The Social Dilemma: The “curse” of social media

By Joanne Laurier, 20 October 2020

The Social Dilemma is a docudrama hybrid that explores, according to its creators, “how social media is reprogramming civilization” in a dangerous direction.

Guitarist Eddie Van Halen dead at age 65

By Kevin Reed, 19 October 2020

Eddie Van Halen, the renowned electric guitarist with the popular rock band Van Halen, died in Santa Monica, California, at age 65 on Oct. 6.

Rick Poynor’s David King: Designer, Activist, Visual Historian: An important new work on the revolutionary socialist, artist and defender of historical truth

By Kevin Reed and David Walsh, 16 October 2020

If David King is not better known, it is attributable largely to the shift to the right in so-called intellectual circles, their hostility to the October Revolution and their growing social indifference.

Tesla: The cognizable, knowable scientist and visionary

By Joanne Laurier, 15 October 2020

Written and directed by Michael Almereyda, Tesla is a drama about the life of Serbian-American engineer and physicist Nikola Tesla (1856-1943), a remarkable figure. Ethan Hawke plays Tesla.

More than three-quarters of event workers have lost all of their income

Live music industry in the US faces “massive collapse” due to pandemic

By David Walsh, 14 October 2020

The devastation has implications that go beyond even the immediate economic situation, as desperate as that is. The coronavirus crisis is threatening to wipe out a considerable portion of cultural life in the US.

The Artist’s Wife: A portrait of the artist as an aging semi-entrepreneur

By Joanne Laurier, 12 October 2020

The Artist’s Wife looks at a successful painter’s life. The artistic personality continues to fascinate the public. But does the film shed much light on the phenomenon?

Keyboard virtuoso Rick Wakeman returns to outer space, progressive rock with The Red Planet

By Kevin Reed, 10 October 2020

Wakeman has released a new progressive rock album in advance of the 50th anniversary of the first successful orbit of Mars by a man-made probe.

New study throws light on Nazi past of Berlin film festival’s founder

By Stefan Steinberg, 9 October 2020

Alfred Bauer (1911-1986) was not the only prominent film personality to cover up his or her connections to the Nazi regime.

Toronto International Film Festival 2020: Part 4

Contemporary politics, but semi-hysterical politics: New Order, Shorta and others

By David Walsh, 8 October 2020

The position of contemporary filmmaking in relation to contemporary political and social realities is very poor. Little of the advanced, convulsive state of things comes through in the films currently being made.

Tens of thousands laid off as major exhibitor Cineworld closes movie theaters in US and UK

By Matthew MacEgan, 7 October 2020

The world’s second-largest movie theater chain announced that it will close over 600 locations this week, resulting in the loss of employment for 45,000 workers.

Blatant censorship: Retrospective of American painter Philip Guston delayed four years

By Clare Hurley, 6 October 2020

The decision by four major art museums in the UK and US to postpone for four years “Philip Guston Now,” a long-planned retrospective of one of postwar America’s most significant artists, is a cowardly act of censorship.

An interview from 2016 with Victoria Bynum, historian and author of The Free State of Jones

By David Walsh and Joanne Laurier, 5 October 2020

We are reposting today an interview we conducted with Victoria Bynum in July 2016 at the time of the release of Free State of Jones, which is now available again on Netflix.

Free State of Jones available again on Netflix

By Joanne Laurier, 5 October 2020

This important film from 2016 is now available again on Netflix. It is a rebuke to the racialist politics of the New York Times and the Democratic Party and to the 1619 Project in particular.

Ratched on Netflix: Rehabilitating a petty tyrant

By Carlos Delgado, 3 October 2020

The show is a ridiculous, bloody spectacle of mayhem and murder, with a hefty dose of feminism for good measure.

Challenger: The Final Flight: A four-part docuseries on the 1986 disaster

By Joanne Laurier, 2 October 2020

Challenger: The Final Flight, a docuseries on Netflix, deals with the tragic explosion of NASA’s Space Shuttle Challenger in January 1986, which killed seven crew members.

A muse of postwar France: Singer and actress Juliette Gréco (1927-2020)

By Paul Bond, 1 October 2020

Singer and actress Juliette Gréco’s considerable achievements are bound up inextricably with the problems of postwar French intellectual and cultural life.

Toronto International Film Festival 2020: Part 3

Limbo, Gaza mon amour, The Disciple: Art is both richer and duller than life

By David Walsh, 30 September 2020

Leon Trotsky pointed out in a 1939 article, unpublished during his lifetime, that “in a certain sense” art was “richer than life, for it can both overstate and understate.”

Tenor Placido Domingo, defending his character and reputation, retracts “apologies” for alleged sexual harassment

By Fred Mazelis, 29 September 2020

Operatic tenor Placido Domingo told an interviewer for Spanish television last Saturday that his apologies last February for alleged sexual misconduct had been taken out of context, and that he was not guilty of abuse or mistreatment.

Metropolitan Opera announces cancellation of entire 2020–2021 season

By Fred Mazelis, 26 September 2020

Management is demanding major concessions from its musicians, who have been furloughed without pay since March.

Toronto International Film Festival 2020: Part 2

Frances McDormand in Nomadland—the danger of making a virtue out of necessity—and David Byrne’s American Utopia (directed by Spike Lee)

By David Walsh, 25 September 2020

It is a serious mistake, a terrible irresponsibility, to treat life in this manner, to turn the social into the “natural” and inevitable.

Toronto International Film Festival 2020: Part one

76 Days: The drama of the Wuhan lockdown

Under the Open Sky from Japan, The Best Is Yet to Come from China

By David Walsh, 23 September 2020

This year’s event presented some 60 feature films, a sharp decline from the more than 330 screened in 2019, with the festival organizers forecasting a 50 percent decline in revenue throughout 2020.

King’s Disease: Beware the nostrums of Nas

By Erik Schreiber, 22 September 2020

A skilled and engaging rapper, Nas remains committed to a message reflecting his confusion, racialist politics and considerable business interests.

The Stranger on Netflix: A world of secrets, unraveled

By Carlos Delgado, 21 September 2020

A suburban father’s life is upended when a stranger reveals a devastating secret.

Toots Hibbert, ska and reggae giant: “Right now, someone else has that number”

By Paul Bond, 19 September 2020

Hibbert was widely respected and liked as a person, as well as admired for his work. That he was one of the most important international ambassadors for reggae owed much to his personal integrity.

Charlie Kaufman’s I’m Thinking of Ending Things: A neglected man neglected again

By Joanne Laurier, 18 September 2020

In Kaufman’s latest film, a high school janitor, presumably in the moments before his final mental collapse and physical self-destruction, has his life—or, rather, for the most part, a fantasy version of his life—flash before his (and our) eyes.

British actress Diana Rigg (1938-2020)

By Paul Bond, 17 September 2020

Rigg was a fine classical actress who ended up successfully negotiating the transition back and forth between stage and television.

An interview with Michael Fitzgerald, producer of Waiting for the Barbarians

By David Walsh, 16 September 2020

Fitzgerald has a history in movies extending back to the late 1970s. He first produced two films with John Huston, Wise Blood (1979) and Under the Volcano (1984).

Beyoncé’s Black is King: A self-absorbed ode to “blackness”

By Nick Barrickman, 14 September 2020

The US singer-songwriter’s musical film and visual album seeks to focus its lens on the African continent and its diaspora, with decidedly limited effects.

Australia’s brutal immigration policy in Stateless: “What is my crime?”

By Joanne Laurier, 12 September 2020

Stateless, now showing on Netflix, deals with the harsh Australian immigration detention program and the horrors inflicted on persecuted refugees fleeing colonial wars.

Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences plan for racial and gender criteria: A right-wing attack on artistic freedom

By David Walsh, 11 September 2020

The actions reveal that the affluent layer in charge in Hollywood is either indifferent or hostile to the process by which art is created, and determined to pursue its selfish, grasping political and economic agenda.

Film version of Jack London’s Martin Eden: An artist who loses touch with everyday life

By David Walsh, 11 September 2020

Directed by Italian filmmaker Pietro Marcello, the film is a valuable adaptation of London’s well-known 1909 novel, transposed to mid-20th century Italy.

Two novellas on the #MeToo issue: Mary Gaitskill’s This is Pleasure and James Lasdun’s Afternoon of a Faun

By Sandy English, 9 September 2020

Two recent works of fiction interestingly portray the #MeToo campaign in operation, but don’t criticize (or probe deeply) much of what needs to be criticized.

Memorial on Detroit’s Belle Isle provides sobering tribute to the city’s victims of coronavirus

By Stephen Fuller and Helen Halyard, 4 September 2020

The city declared Monday Detroit Memorial Day and transformed the state park into a large-scale memorial for the 1,500 residents who have died from COVID-19 so far this year.

The promotion of Black capitalism in Pharrell Williams & Jay-Z’s “Entrepreneur”

By Elliott Murtagh, 4 September 2020

Hip-hop stars Pharrell Williams and Jay-Z sing the praises of Black capitalism in their new single “Entrepreneur,” part of TIME magazine’s “New American Revolution” campaign.

Coup 53 recounts the role of British intelligence in overthrowing Mosaddegh government in Iran

By Jean Shaoul, 3 September 2020

The film documents the part played by MI6 in the 1953 Anglo-American coup that ousted Iran’s nationalist Prime Minister Mohammad Mosaddegh and ushered in 26 years of a murderous dictatorship under Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi.

Waiting for the Barbarians: “You are an obscene torturer. You deserve to be hanged!”

By David Walsh, 2 September 2020

Based on the 1980 novel by South Africa-born writer J.M. Coetzee, with also—importantly—a screenplay by Coetzee, the film is set on the remote outskirts of a fictional (or composite) “Empire” sometime apparently in the 19th century.

Immigration Nation reveals the suffering of migrants at the hands of the US detention and deportation machine

By Fred Mazelis, 1 September 2020

The Trump administration tried to stop or delay the release of this important documentary.

Radioactive: The pioneering efforts of physicist and chemist Marie Curie

By Joanne Laurier, 31 August 2020

Marie Curie (1867-1934) was the first woman to win the Nobel Prize, and the first person and only woman to win it twice. Her life and work are the subject matter of Iranian-born French filmmaker Marjane Satrapi’s feature.

Tate UK strikers: “COVID-19 is being used to inflict a jobs massacre”

By Paul Mitchell, 29 August 2020

Strikers warn that the pandemic is being used to enforce unprecedented job cuts and further privatise the arts and culture sector.

100 years since the birth of jazz master Charlie Parker

By John Andrews, 29 August 2020

Today, fans throughout the world are celebrating the centenary of the birth of Charlie Parker, an inventor of bebop and one of the greatest figures in the history of jazz.

Ghosts of West Virginia: A moving new album by Steve Earle & The Dukes

By Matthew Brennan, 27 August 2020

The album was created in conjunction with a stage play about the 2010 Upper Big Branch (UBB) mine explosion in West Virginia, which killed 29 coal miners.

On the passing of musician Justin Townes Earle, 1982-2020

By Hiram Lee and Matthew Brennan, 27 August 2020

During the writing of the review of Ghosts of West Virginia, the recent album by veteran singer-musician Steve Earle, news reports indicated that his talented 38-year-old musician son Justin Townes Earle passed away on August 20.

Julian Bream (1933-2020): Pioneer of the classical guitar

By Paul Bond, 26 August 2020

A turning point for Bream was hearing recordings of Andrés Segovia (1893-1987), another great guitarist, whose transcriptions of Baroque compositions helped shape the modern repertoire.

Seberg: The story of actress Jean Seberg racialized and trivialized

By James Brewer, 25 August 2020

Decisions made in the script distorted the film’s narrative before the highly capable cast ever got in front of the camera.

The Truth: Catherine Deneuve as an actress with her feet on the ground

By David Walsh, 22 August 2020

A French actress in her 70s, Fabienne Dangeville, receives a visit at her elegant Paris home from her daughter Lumir, son-in-law Hank and grand-daughter Charlotte, who live in New York.

Desert One: Barbara Kopple returns to the fold with her Iran hostage crisis film

By David Walsh, 21 August 2020

Released in theaters or available to stream today, Desert One is a documentary film about the US military’s effort in April 1980 to free American embassy staff captured during the 1979 Iranian revolution.

Kelly Reichardt’s First Cow: Two men in the wilderness face something more dangerous—big business

By Joanne Laurier, 19 August 2020

US filmmaker Kelly Reichardt’s new film, First Cow, set in the 1820s in the Pacific Northwest, deals with the origins of North American business—and the value of and the need for solidarity.

Helen Mirren, Ian McKellen in The Good Liar: The consequences of light-mindedness

By David Walsh, 17 August 2020

Essential conformism on important matters seems an apt summing up of Bill Condon’s film career to date. At any rate, The Good Liar will not do much to change one’s attitude.

British filmmaker Alan Parker (1944-2020): An establishment rebel

By Paul Bond, 14 August 2020

A genuinely popular director of no small talent, he subordinated his critical instincts to a popularist slickness.

The debut of Coriky, a new band featuring members of Fugazi and The Evens

By Matthew Brennan, 13 August 2020

The new self-titled album distributes a considerable amount of opposition and anger across 11 songs. The results are uneven.

Producers push reckless resumption of North American film production in face of pandemic

By Lee Parsons, 11 August 2020

In an indication of the studios’ disregard for the health and safety of workers, now showing up in film production contracts are waivers designed to give the employers legal immunity from suits over failure to provide protection against the virus.

Theater on your personal device

The Line movingly conveys health care workers’ struggles during the pandemic

By Erik Schreiber, 7 August 2020

A powerful play based on interviews shows how New York City’s health care workers battled the pandemic as the health care system collapsed around them.

The Invisible Man: A woman struck by an “unseen hand”

By Joanne Laurier, 3 August 2020

The Invisible Man feeds on the #MeToo mood, becoming the latest entry in what one critic calls “boom times for feminist revenge narratives.”

Shirley: A fictionalized account of writer Shirley Jackson’s life

By David Walsh, 29 July 2020

Even those belonging to certain generations who do not know Jackson’s name will likely recall her disturbing 1948 short story, “The Lottery,” one of the most anthologized pieces of fiction in American history.

What is the New York Times up to at the Detroit Institute of Arts?

By David Walsh, 27 July 2020

Controversies have emerged at the Detroit Institute of Arts, the remarkable art museum, whose director has been accused of a conflict of interest and “a certain deafness on race.”

Hamilton: An American Musical finally available for broader viewing

By Ed Hightower, 24 July 2020

Amid deepening social and political crisis Hamilton came to the Disney Plus streaming service this July 3 in time for viewing on the 244th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence

Italian composer Francesco Lotoro rescues music composed in the concentration camps

By Fred Mazelis, 21 July 2020

Lotoro has devoted three decades to the research and discovery of music written and performed in defiance of Nazi barbarism.

Fire damages historic Nantes cathedral in France

By Will Morrow, 20 July 2020

While the structure of the building so far appears to have been saved, the greatest losses are the organ and stained-glass windows behind it, which were destroyed.

#Anne Frank Parallel Stories: The young victim of the Nazis

By Joanne Laurier, 18 July 2020

#Anne Frank Parallel Stories is a documentary streaming on Netflix that retraces the life of Anne Frank, as well as five living women who survived the Nazi concentration camps in World War II.

RTJ4: Run the Jewels melds “rebellion” with reaction

By Erik Schreiber, 14 July 2020

Despite its musical interest, the new album by rap duo Run the Jewels shows Killer Mike and El-P to be seriously disoriented, or worse, in the current upheavals.